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Visiting Cornwall with Children - the Eden Project!!

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

If you are visiting Cornwall, the Eden Project is a must see! I had high expectations and it did not disappoint. It's huge, it's amazing and it's so inspiring. It has to be the largest environmental learning centre I've seen. The Eden Project was built on a disused clay quarry and the aim was to showcase some of the world's most significant plants. But what it really does is showcase the relationship between plants and people and the amazing biodiversity we have on Earth. 

"Eden is a gateway into the relationships between plants and people, and a fascinating insight into the story of mankind's dependence on plant life. Not only a mind-blowing visitor attraction, Eden is also fast-becoming a unique resource for education and knowledge towards a sustainable future." - Visit Cornwall

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

The most striking features of the Eden Project are the large Biomes. The Rainforest (tropical) Biome and a Mediterranean Biome. The Rainforest Biome has multi-levels and my children could spend a whole day in there. It is full of interactive educational displays and opportunities for hands-on learning.

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

"Humans are a part of nature, not apart from nature." - Eden Project Cofounder Sir Tim Smit.

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

The Biomes were an architectural challenge, they are fantastic to see in person. You can see them being built here. Whenever we visit a major site or landmark I have Caspar and Otis research it first. Sometimes it is child led and they research parts that appeal to them and other times I'm specific "Caspar can you find out why the Eden Project is built where it is", "Do they have any engaged plants". I find they are a lot more engaged on the day and learn a lot more, it's like visiting is an extension of their learning, rather than learning it all on site, and then forgetting it later or being too tired to take it all in. The Corpse Flower, Titan arum, although not flowering was a highlight as were the various fruit plants like pineapple, bananas and cacao.

Caspar and Otis on suspension bridge at Eden Project at How we Montessori May 2019

The largest greenhouse in the world! 

Caspar and Otis on suspension bridge at Eden Project at How we Montessori May 2019

If your children are interested in ecosystems, biomes, botany, evolution, biodiversity, sustainability, agriculture, gardening - this is the place to visit. Throughout the year they run special events, workshops, host guest speakers and exhibitions, and even a toddler play group, it's work checking out what's on before visiting.

Caspar and Otis on suspension bridge at Eden Project at How we Montessori May 2019

Caspar and Otis on the Rainforest Canopy Walkway. 

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

The outdoor sculptures are breathtaking!

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

The Eden Project has a 30-acre outdoor garden. There is so much to explore!

Eden garden at the Eden Project at How we Montessori

During the school holidays, the Eden Project can get busy, I suggest pre-booking tickets and arriving early. As the Biomes and the Core (learning centre) are all indoors this is a great place to visit on rainy days too.

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