In the last couple of weeks, Sydney has had some crazy, stormy and rainy weather. It's been the perfect time to study clouds! Above Otto (4yrs) tells me the clouds look like waves. The Cloud Identifier is hands down THE BEST tool we've used for studying clouds. It helps us to identify the clouds we are looking at, but more importantly, it has sparked a huge interest in clouds and what they look like. After we began using the Cloud Identifier, Otto started asking about clouds throughout the day and while we are out and about. The Cloud Identifier is... Read more →


Today I am sharing some practical life food prep ideas for two-year-olds! It is SO important to follow your child's development. Your child may be ready for some of these activities like peeling a banana earlier at 18 months. There are other activities that your child might not be ready for until they are three years old. You know your child best so please use these ideas as a guide only. I have listed these activities chronologically. The first activities are for younger children and the activities at the end are for older. There is a big difference in the... Read more →


Have you tried any new practical life activities lately? Here are five new practical life activities that we've been enjoying! Picking dried lavender. We have a lavender bush in our front yard that we can use but lavender is also available in small bunches in the flower section of our local supermarket. I've found this easiest if the lavender is dried, we cut lavender from the bush and leave it in the sun or in a window sill for a couple of days to let it dry. The child can pull the fragrant flowers off from the stem. It smells... Read more →


Do your children enjoy playing with Magnetic Tiles? We've had a small set of Magnetic Tiles for years however Otto (pictured) received another set for his fourth birthday. ๐ŸŽ‚ He can do so much more building with this extra set, it's really opened up new ideas and new creations! Magnetic tiles can help to develop: concentration and focus critical thinking problem-solving skills creativity visual discrimination skills geometry skills patterning skills coordination independent play. Most of all we like to use magnetic tiles for open-ended play. But I believe in getting the most out of our materials, rotating toys and presenting... Read more →


I have something so fun to share with you today! I recently discovered the new subscription boxes from Montessori For Every Child and I placed an order as soon as I could. The subscription boxes have been designed by Harshitha who is a qualified Montessori teacher and parent, right here in Sydney. Yes, this is a subscription box based in Australia! ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ The subscription boxes are designed for children from 2.5 years to seven years. I've used the subscription boxes with my four-year-old and there was a lot he could do. Some of the activities can be adapted depending on... Read more →


Setting the table is a practical life skill that we can introduce to our children from a young age. As soon as we start introducing solids we can use a Montessori Weaning Set (pictured two below). As soon as the child can walk they can begin to take their placemat and put it on their table followed by their fork, spoon, plate or glass. Without saying a word, simply by presenting the materials on the placemat, we are teaching the child where everything goes. By the time the child is a toddler, they may be able to set their entire... Read more →


Pegs are a common household item that can be used for many children's activities. Depending on the type of pegs you have, you can start using pegs with your child from toddlerhood. Flexible plastic pegs can work best for young children while stronger stainless steel or wooden pegs are fantastic for preschoolers. Pegs can be found in many grocery stores and mini wooden pegs are available in stationary or educational supply stores. Pegs that we pinch the end to use are fantastic for helping children develop the pincer grasp, fine motor skills, hand strength, coordination and dexterity. Large wooden play... Read more →


This is the first book I've read by biomechanist Katy Bowman and I love it so much it's my book of 2021. It's for all parents and caregivers, those expecting, with infants or toddlers, right through to those with teens and young adults. This is a book for every parent and caregiver, it's for every teacher. Grow Wild is all about movement and there couldn't be a more pertinent time for us to be incorporating more movement into our children's lives. Grow Wild contains information on the science of movement, the science of sedentarism with a ton of practical ideas... Read more →


I was recently asked on the How we Montessori Facebook page for recommendations on resources for teaching young children about emotions. This is one area where they may not be one Montessori approach however I am more than happy to share the resources that we use. Teaching children to identify and name emotions is the first step in teaching children about their own emotions and the emotions of others. It's also a good way to teach children there are a range of emotions and all emotions are ok. Once children can name their emotions they can better express themselves, feel... Read more →


It's Spring (here in Australia)! It's that time of year when we are thinking about sunny days, flowers, bees and new life. Butterflies are a popular topic that we'll be looking at as well as lifecycles. Here are a few butterfly puzzles that look amazing, below you can see the ones we are using. Photographic Butterfly Puzzle (UK) - 9 pieces, recommended from 2 years+. Australian Butterfly Jigsaw Set (AU) - 6 mini jigsaw puzzles, 3 pieces in each puzzle, the name of each butterfly is written on the puzzle. Recommended for toddlers. Montessori Butterfly Puzzle - three-piece puzzle. Montessori... Read more →


We've been learning about animal skeletons! I'm not sure how we fell into this topic but it's been a lot of fun. For a few months now we've been loving Whose Bones? board book it's one of Otto's (4yrs) favourites. The pages open out, so at first, you can only see the skeleton and the child can guess what animal it belongs to. Then we open the page out and see the whole animal and find some facts about each animal. My older children love these anatomy models and I've found them useful for teaching Otto about skeletons. This is... Read more →


I've previously written about the Developmental Stage of Drawing as I find these stages in development endlessly fascinating. I recently discovered the Developmental Stage of Writing. I love this chart below as it isn't about what age your child is, but rather where your child is developmentally. It can help us understand where our child is at and what stage they are going into. Source: First seen at Destination Kindergarten, also available at West Hartford Public Schools. My child has just turned four (48 months) and is Pre-Literate. He is in the Symbolic/Mock Letters stage but is also close to... Read more →


Do you have a Nature or Seasonal Table at home? A Nature or Seasonable Table is a table, a shelf, or we can use a tray, where together with our children we can create beautiful scenes and collect items from nature that reflect the rhythms of the season outside. The Nature Table enables children to touch, look at closely, smell and listen to some of the things in our natural environment. It encourages an interest in, and respect for, the natural world. We can also use our Nature Table for storytelling, exploring themes like lifecycles and simply enjoying the beauty... Read more →


Have you tried any new or different practical life activities recently? While there are activities that become favourites and the children love to do, we also like to introduce new activities depending on the season or what the rest of the family is engaged with. Occasionally I will try things that my child has struggled with previously to see if they are ready for it. I've tried garlic crushing many times with my three-year-old but he didn't have the strength to use the garlic crusher. This week we tried a new rocking garlic crusher, and while it was still difficult... Read more →


I've previously written about all the good reasons to use crayons before markers. As Otto gets closer to four I've been paying special attention to his pencil grip and drawings. Recently he has been using markers almost exclusively and a solid cylindrical grasp. Markers are easy for the child to use, the child doesn't need to apply much pressure and the marker glides over the paper. They are an easy and colourful way to draw. Crayons require much more effort. So I decided it was time to put away the markers for a while. Stages of Early Mark Making image... Read more →